How Would You Feel if You Quit Smoking? It's Time to Put Your Health First.

We know that our readers desire to quit their nasty smoking habit. It's not just a pie-in-the-sky idea. It's something they think about each and every day. At the same time, smokers entertain a range of reasons they will quit and reasons they will continue. They all know that smoking is bad for their health. They always weigh the pros and cons in their minds, trying to rationalize the habit into something more or less than it really is. Smoking is the monster that they cannot kill and their best friend when they feed the nightmarish urge to light up. Have you ever thought about what type of smoker you are? Download our guide below to find out:

What type of smoker are you

 

In this post, we want to talk to smokers as real people and to share a success story from Marie, a former nicotine addict:  

"My name is Marie. On Christmas Day six years ago, I was sitting in the emergency room. It was 9:00 p.m., and I was with my husband. I had a moderate case of asthma. Being a light smoker, I had noticed lately that my health condition was getting worse. I was experiencing shortness of breath at work, and the new blood pressure pills my doctor gave me were only helping some. After my emergency inhaler didn't relieve the symptoms of my asthma attack and I was waiting to see the doctor in the ER, I began to panic. I couldn't breathe right. The physician's assistant gave me an albuterol treatment, raised my pulse oxygen level, and then quickly discharged me. I promised myself that I would never smoke a cigarette again, and, to this day, I've never had one. I had a few puffs of a cigar recently, but that wasn't the same experience at all. When I think about smoking again, all I must do is recall that feeling of air not getting into my lungs. My chest cavity would not expand in the normal way, and it was terrifying. I imagine that's how one would feel with lung cancer or emphysema, but it's probably much worse. What's even better is that secondhand smoke drives me crazy, usually killing my cravings. These aren't as frequent, but they do occur from time to time, especially in social situations."

The Takeaway: Any of us could quit smoking once we make up our mind, but it's easier when we're sure that we can control our urges. For Marie, it's a matter of life or death. To quit, we must be really done with the tobacco habit and ready to move on. We must place our personal health and wellbeing above those nasty cravings and find other things to do with our time.   

What Works for One Doesn't Work for All. Trust Us, We Know!

If you want to succeed at smoking cessation like Marie, you must make that commitment to yourself. You are an individual with your own sources of motivation for the tobacco habit. You could be addicted to those chemicals that the manufacturer has packed into the product, but you might also enjoy smoking with people in your social circle. For example, we came across the idea that people may "postpone work, social, or recreational events in order to smoke." While this may seem like a random example to pull out of the air, it's also evidence of how a nicotine addiction is enmeshed in so many aspects of a smoker's daily life. It's an influencer of so many of your personal choices. If you could quit smoking, you could get your life back and easily find time for activities besides lighting up away from nonsmokers. 

For more details on quitting smoking, please contact us today.

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